Archived Health Sciences Library Announcements

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March 5 - May 18, 2012
Lower Level 2

Archives & Special Collections is pleased to announce a new exhibit, "Civil War Medicine," commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Using original books, medical journals, letters, and documents, the exhibit tells how American medicine coped with the greatest war in our nation's history with total casualties of 620,000.

As one scholar noted, the Civil War took place during "the very last years of the medical middle ages." When war broke out in 1861, the bacteriological revolution of Pasteur, Lister, and Koch was still a decade away. The usual medical practice of bleeding the patient and of dosing him with massive quantities of calomel and antimony probably did more harm than good. Overall mortality for the sick and wounded was about 53% in the Union Army, perhaps higher among Confederates.

On display are the 1st U.S. edition of Florence Nightingale's "Notes on Nursing," which had a beneficial influence on American military hospital practice; "The Hand-Book for the Military Surgeon" (1861), an important work for Union army surgeons by Charles Tripler, an 1827 P&S graduate; Louisa May Alcott's "Hospital Sketches" (1863), recounting her experiences as an army nurse in Washington; and an original 1864 contract in which David Webb Hodgkins (P&S 1863) signed up to be a surgeon in the U.S. Army for $100 a month.

For more information, contact the exhibit curator, Stephen Novak, at hslarchives@columbia.edu

Book cover image

Anil K. Lalwani, MD
Professor and Vice Chair for Research
Director, Division of Otology
Director, Columbia Cochlear Implant Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Co-edited:
Recent Advances in Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery
Maryland Heights: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd, 2012. (Buy book)

In this issue:

  • Anatomy TV Head & Neck for Dentistry
  • New NIH clinical trial Web site
  • One reader to another
  • Apple, Google & Twitter under fire for privacy issues...

.. and more

Anil K. Lalwani, MD
Professor and Vice Chair for Research
Director, Division of Otology
Director, Columbia Cochlear Implant Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Edited:
Current diagnosis & treatment in otolaryngology: head & neck surgery
New York: McGraw Hill, 2011. (Get book through CLIO)

February 16 at 6 pm with refreshments at 5:30pm.
Russ Berrie Pavilion, Room 1

In 1952 The Girl in White, was released by MGM. At first glance, this story of a woman doctor who chooses career and husband rather than opting to be a housewife appears to be a unique achievement in Hollywood. However, this was actually one of a number of films in which women physician characters made the choice of remaining on the job after marriage.

In the 2nd History of the Health Sciences Lecture “‘Medicine is a Man’s Game?’ – Women Physicians in the Movies,” Patricia Gallagher, a long-time health information professional who has extensively studied medical women in the movies, will discuss this phenomenon and explain why Hollywood, at least, decided that women physicians actually could have it all.

For more information contact Stephen Novak at hslarchives@columbia.edu.

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